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News on the latest in design, manufacturing, fabrication, construction, and engineering technology.


Simplify the conversion for inline Revit equipment to Fabrication content by utilizing the Fabrication Design Line Node concept and applying it to Families in Revit.

eVolve’s 3D Move tool One of the best tools for Revit you aren’t using   The 3D move tool takes a family selection and places it to another point. This works much like a snapping tool and gets you right where you want to be. In this example I will take a strut and place 2 families at the very top of the strut using this tool. The strut is at a different elevation than the other 2 families. In a 3D vie lets snap these two items in place. Run the 3D move by selecting it or using the shortcut. Select a point on the wire-way. Next select a location on the strut. The wire-way will now snap to that location. It will snap just like the picture below placing it on the top of the strut. Now we will do the same for the conduit and place it on the top of the strut. Begin by start by selecting 3D Move, and then the base of the conduit.  Be sure to be aligned with the outside edge and the red centerline.    Then select the face of ...

How to Mix System family conduit with eVolve<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   We get asked the question sometimes. “Can I mix the two together”.  While I don’t suggest it, it can be done. There are a few things to consider. Have a good knowledgebase on Schedules and parameters. With this information you can bring together most items in with eVolve content and have it look good in a schedule. Let’s take a look at three runs in a project. One of the system type, one of eVolve content and one with a mixed bag.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> Below we have sheet and some variations of scheduling for the out of the box system conduit. <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   Take notice of the 4 types of Schedules that Conduit run schedule has the most to offer, Length, Type, and a Diameter. The problem lies in that you have to make the conduit schedules exclusive from the rest of your fittings and whatever else you want to buy.  In Conduit Fittings you can count the elbows but no real data. So you will wind up make a bunch of different schedules and crossing your fingers ...

In part 1 we discussed the connector. Now in part 2 we will show how to make flex combined with the fittings you want and how to see it in material counts. The method we will use will combine a system family with our component families to later use in models or embed into a template file.  In house this method is used all the time. Let’s begin inside a Revit project.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   Insert the families for the flex, sealtite or MC that we made in the previous blog tutorial.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>     Select the connector type you want use and the size you want. We are going to tie specifics to the system family to mate up with the fittings. Place an instance in a plan view. It should be something like this.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> Next under Flex Pipes create a new “Type”. Since we are doing Sealtite in part 2 our types look like so.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> We are making a 1” whip so we will size the types to meet the standards of Trade sizes.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> For good measure I added insulation to this as well to get it up to the actual ...

eVolve   A Co-Developer’s Perspective   So what is eVolve? eVolve is a solution for the electrical contractor/constructor who wants to fabricate from the model. It’s no great benefit just to model a coordination model for electrical and not build from it. The challenges were that even if we modeled using just Revit or AutoCAD MEP,  extracting the data to prefabricate from those models was tough. So first, we had to come up with a solution that worked for our team, and in order to do that we had to standardize the parts list as well as our process. Without these things in place it would fall apart. So that meant nailing down a brands list of our most used components, and starting there. Since eVolve was originally built just for Corbins Electric, that was the perspective. Second we needed to map out how best to deliver the deliverables downstream. We decided that ordering our parts before starting our Sheet sets or “spools” would allow us time to get our products in house at the same time or just before we would build them. ...