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Rick Buckman
Rick Buckman
Rick Buckman's Blog


So with the latest Star Wars movie coming out soon I was inspired to toy with the idea of modeling a full scale Revit family of the AT AT. Originally it was shown in the Empire Strikes Back. This was one of my all time favorites. While taking this project on I see that there are some valid challenges in creating some of the geometry. So if you ever want to improve your skills on creating families this is a fun way to not only make something cool but to improve your skills. I under- laid flat 2d images and scaled them up for reference. the rest is purely improvising. I enclosed some preliminary images. Check back later and I will post my progress pics. Remember have fun. Enjoy!.

So I am doing my first AU class this year on eVolve. It's not to late to get in and get a look a look at the offering that is flipping the lid on the electrical fabricator's process. I will be speaking and as well will have Aaron Thompson as a co-speaker for this class giving a brief history on why we took the journey. Come check us out this year at Autodesk University.   Class Info: MEP21690 - eVolve Your Electrical Models to Fabrication Come see the eVolve Revit software add-in from the end user’s perspective. The eVolve add-in facilitates in electrical design and detailing the automation of numerous manual tasks in detailing/installation drawings needed for fabrication, all via the Revit software platform. Corbins Electric, developer of this add-on, has taken Revit software for electrical to the next level. Revit software users now have highly intelligent custom family components, modeling tools, drawing creation tools, and visual-graphics tools. These tools improve productivity, efficiency, and accuracy—all to reduce waste and cost on the design and fabrication processes. Come hear Corbins explain why it was ...

eVolve’s 3D Move tool One of the best tools for Revit you aren’t using   The 3D move tool takes a family selection and places it to another point. This works much like a snapping tool and gets you right where you want to be. In this example I will take a strut and place 2 families at the very top of the strut using this tool. The strut is at a different elevation than the other 2 families. In a 3D vie lets snap these two items in place. Run the 3D move by selecting it or using the shortcut. Select a point on the wire-way. Next select a location on the strut. The wire-way will now snap to that location. It will snap just like the picture below placing it on the top of the strut. Now we will do the same for the conduit and place it on the top of the strut. Begin by start by selecting 3D Move, and then the base of the conduit.  Be sure to be aligned with the outside edge and the red centerline.    Then select the face of ...

How to Mix System family conduit with eVolve<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   We get asked the question sometimes. “Can I mix the two together”.  While I don’t suggest it, it can be done. There are a few things to consider. Have a good knowledgebase on Schedules and parameters. With this information you can bring together most items in with eVolve content and have it look good in a schedule. Let’s take a look at three runs in a project. One of the system type, one of eVolve content and one with a mixed bag.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> Below we have sheet and some variations of scheduling for the out of the box system conduit. <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   Take notice of the 4 types of Schedules that Conduit run schedule has the most to offer, Length, Type, and a Diameter. The problem lies in that you have to make the conduit schedules exclusive from the rest of your fittings and whatever else you want to buy.  In Conduit Fittings you can count the elbows but no real data. So you will wind up make a bunch of different schedules and crossing your fingers ...

Create Family clearances that will can be controlled in Navis and Revit<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> In some projects you are asked to show clearances for equipment. So you may think fine I will draw a box to represent the clearance and it will grow with the component etc. Before doing so think about a few things. Do you need to be able to segregate or turn off this Clearance in Navis Works or produce Views that can control it in Revit. Here are some options for you.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> First Create a Sub category in the Family level that you will use throughout the project as the Norm or create this name at the company level so that in any project this is a recognizable name. If you have variables of this name, it will be case sensitive and you will gain additional instances in the Project.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> Now create the standard definitions of line type and color to signify your clearances. You can also define a custom material at this level. The Next step is to draw the shape for clearances. Assign the constraints to the shape ...

Getting a question mark on a tag placement? It could be a couple of things but this avenue will be related to nested families. First off if you are tracking nested families in a schedule make sure to mark them as shared before nesting them. Otherwise you will have a physical representation but it will be hidden otherwise from tags and data. Once in a file the host family will result in a tag. If the parameter, you are tracking in the tag does not exist you will get a question mark. To tag through the host family you just need to activate the tag and tab over the item you want to tag. sometimes as group assortments of child families into a host you will want this feature to get down to nuts and bolts. 

In part 1 we discussed the connector. Now in part 2 we will show how to make flex combined with the fittings you want and how to see it in material counts. The method we will use will combine a system family with our component families to later use in models or embed into a template file.  In house this method is used all the time. Let’s begin inside a Revit project.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   Insert the families for the flex, sealtite or MC that we made in the previous blog tutorial.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>     Select the connector type you want use and the size you want. We are going to tie specifics to the system family to mate up with the fittings. Place an instance in a plan view. It should be something like this.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> Next under Flex Pipes create a new “Type”. Since we are doing Sealtite in part 2 our types look like so.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> We are making a 1” whip so we will size the types to meet the standards of Trade sizes.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> For good measure I added insulation to this as well to get it up to the actual ...

eVolve   A Co-Developer’s Perspective   So what is eVolve? eVolve is a solution for the electrical contractor/constructor who wants to fabricate from the model. It’s no great benefit just to model a coordination model for electrical and not build from it. The challenges were that even if we modeled using just Revit or AutoCAD MEP,  extracting the data to prefabricate from those models was tough. So first, we had to come up with a solution that worked for our team, and in order to do that we had to standardize the parts list as well as our process. Without these things in place it would fall apart. So that meant nailing down a brands list of our most used components, and starting there. Since eVolve was originally built just for Corbins Electric, that was the perspective. Second we needed to map out how best to deliver the deliverables downstream. We decided that ordering our parts before starting our Sheet sets or “spools” would allow us time to get our products in house at the same time or just before we would build them. ...

This tutorial will cover how to utilize flex and conduit on a group. This is an approach that I have implemented at the workplace and it presents some creative work-arounds to the lack of content for MEP in Revit. This also is a means to consider when speeding up your modeling efforts. I believe you can use this method in numerous capacity no matter what your discipline.   For a base point I am starting with a family that is hosting 2 separate types of connectors. One of which is a "Conduit" connector as well as a "Piping" connector. This will allow for us to model flex from one end and conduit parts from the other. We are in fact building a transitional assembly.  I will begin in by making the flex fitting family. This is just a straight fitting for going from EMT to Steel flex.(FMC) very common in the electrical trade. We will just use a static part and model the geometry. You can R.E. one in house. Or pull content from the web. Start with a generic family template ...

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