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How to Mix System family conduit with eVolve<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   We get asked the question sometimes. “Can I mix the two together”.  While I don’t suggest it, it can be done. There are a few things to consider. Have a good knowledgebase on Schedules and parameters. With this information you can bring together most items in with eVolve content and have it look good in a schedule. Let’s take a look at three runs in a project. One of the system type, one of eVolve content and one with a mixed bag.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> Below we have sheet and some variations of scheduling for the out of the box system conduit. <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   Take notice of the 4 types of Schedules that Conduit run schedule has the most to offer, Length, Type, and a Diameter. The problem lies in that you have to make the conduit schedules exclusive from the rest of your fittings and whatever else you want to buy.  In Conduit Fittings you can count the elbows but no real data. So you will wind up make a bunch of different schedules and crossing your fingers ...

In part 1 we discussed the connector. Now in part 2 we will show how to make flex combined with the fittings you want and how to see it in material counts. The method we will use will combine a system family with our component families to later use in models or embed into a template file.  In house this method is used all the time. Let’s begin inside a Revit project.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   Insert the families for the flex, sealtite or MC that we made in the previous blog tutorial.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>     Select the connector type you want use and the size you want. We are going to tie specifics to the system family to mate up with the fittings. Place an instance in a plan view. It should be something like this.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> Next under Flex Pipes create a new “Type”. Since we are doing Sealtite in part 2 our types look like so.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> We are making a 1” whip so we will size the types to meet the standards of Trade sizes.<data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p>   <data-blogger-escaped-o:p></data-blogger-escaped-o:p> For good measure I added insulation to this as well to get it up to the actual ...

This tutorial will cover how to utilize flex and conduit on a group. This is an approach that I have implemented at the workplace and it presents some creative work-arounds to the lack of content for MEP in Revit. This also is a means to consider when speeding up your modeling efforts. I believe you can use this method in numerous capacity no matter what your discipline.   For a base point I am starting with a family that is hosting 2 separate types of connectors. One of which is a "Conduit" connector as well as a "Piping" connector. This will allow for us to model flex from one end and conduit parts from the other. We are in fact building a transitional assembly.  I will begin in by making the flex fitting family. This is just a straight fitting for going from EMT to Steel flex.(FMC) very common in the electrical trade. We will just use a static part and model the geometry. You can R.E. one in house. Or pull content from the web. Start with a generic family template ...

Within Revit MEP, we have two different types of Families to choose from for conduit layouts.  The first being "Conduit with Fittings" which will layout the conduit run showing separation lines between fittings and the straights.  The second is "Conduit without Fittings" which does use fittings, but does not designate them out in the layout with the division line.  In the example below you will see the greenish conduit is the "without fittings", and the cyanic conduit is "with fittings".  I used two Filters to get the "look", the first filters on the conduit and conduit fittings that contains the word "without", the second filters on the conduit and fittings that do not contain the word "without".  Notice how the junction boxes always fall into the "with" category.              Other than the "looks", there isn't much difference between the two families.  The exception is when we get to schedules.  When you right-click "Schedules/Quantities" in the Project Browser, for conduits you will find selection for Conduit, Conduit Fittings and then Conduit Run.  In my example below I chose just the "Conduit Run" and then ...