Applied Software

rss

News on the latest in design, manufacturing, fabrication, construction, and engineering technology.


Do you use QTO with Revit Models? You should be aware of a bug with QTO and Revit Views that use another Revit View as an Underlay. QTO will quantify any object in the current view including objects in the underlay. A very easy test is to create four walls on Level 1 that form a rectangle, 20'x30'. Create 4 walls on Level 2 that form a rectangle, 20'x15'. Place the Level 2 walls directly above the Level 1 walls and keep Level 1 as in underlay to Level 2. Export your Revit model to DWF and import into QTO. Do a model takeoff and look at the linear takeoff for each level.You will see QTO has counted for Level 1: 4 Walls . Total linear takeoff - 100'.You will see QTO has counted forLevel 2: 8 walls (4 on Level 1 and 4 on Level 2). Total linear takeoff of 170' instead of the correct 70.The good news is the Total Linear Takeoff for the PROJECT is correct. It is NOT Level 1: 100' + Level 2: 170'. ...

I was previously asked how to create a wall that not only changed materials but also changed thicknesses. As with most things in Revit, there are multiple ways to do this.  You could create a compound wall type that had multiple material types, but that would be restrictive in that it would be continuous through out the entire length of the wall.  You could create a Stacked Wall, but again, you would only see the material and thickness change at the point where it was assigned in the properties of the Stacked Wall.  You could simply use the Paint tool to change the material, but this would not change the thickness and would not show on sections correctly.  My solution is to draw a wall within a wall and use the Cut tool to cut one out of the other.  This allows the user to create any type of wall desired at any thickness and place it in any location in as many places as they need.  To accomplish this, you draw the main wall first. Then in plan view, ...